Yasmine Jameelah

Founder & CEO of Transparent Black Girl

transparentblackgirl.com

Yamine Jameelah, Founder of Transparent Black Girl, says that she didn’t find wellness, wellness found her. Through her own honest journey of self-discovery and learning how to heal herself inside and out after gaining 100 lbs in college due to depression/anxiety, she found herself met with a barrage of, “I love how you’re so transparent,” remarks. “I thought it was wonderful that people saw me that way but there were so many other Black women that inspired me to do the same — so I created a space that honored them.” Years later, she has built a wellness collective that shatters unconventional stigmas surrounding what it means to be well for Black people. “Now, we’re not only just Transparent Black Girl but we've expanded as Transparent and Black, to amplify the work we do as a collective, and our newest platform for Black men, Transplant Black Guy."

 

“I thought it was wonderful that people saw me that way but there were so many other Black women that inspired me to do the same — so I created a space that honored them.”

Yasmine’s approach to wellness is all about balance and creating a safe place for healing. “It’s so much more than green juice and yoga — it's a lifestyle. I truly believe that wellness is just as multifaceted as Black people and that healing yourself goes beyond just exercise — it’s healing from generational trauma, it’s getting to know your body, learning what works and what doesn’t.”

“Unfortunately, the wellness industry is very white-washed and it leaves an impression on you that ‘you don't belong here.’ When I was going to yoga classes a decade ago, I was the only Black girl in my class. Years later, it's still the same in a lot of places. It's important to me that people Black people can heal in an environment where they are the priority. So we can understand that we not only deserve access to wellness but that our ancestors were healers and we’ve been doing this work for a very long time.”

 

"It's important to me that people Black people can heal in an environment where they are the priority. So we can understand that we not only deserve access to wellness but that our ancestors were healers and we’ve been doing this work for a very long time.”

Yasmine’s approach to wellness has fostered a lively community that focuses on celebrating yourself and other Black people, especially now, in the midst of the largest civil rights movement in history and a global pandemic. “I want my community to know that it’s ok to love ourselves first and to unplug to find joy in the middle of everything we're facing right now. It’s really a radical act. Because yes, this time is difficult. The rest of the world is starting to wake up and that’s needed, but we’ve been Black all this time. Reminding our community to take care of themselves and to do the things that make them laugh is so important right now.”

 

“I want my community to know that it’s ok to love ourselves first and to unplug to find joy in the middle of everything we're facing right now. It’s really a radical act.

 

“Just this past weekend we had a virtual Juneteenth celebration, where we talked about where we are in this country but we also had twerk sessions — from a young age we’re taught that our bodies are just to be sexualized, so this virtual session was a way for us to reclaim our sexuality and feel free to be open. Wellness doesn’t have to be this intimidating conversation. It’s laughter, it’s reclaiming joy. I think we’re having a lot of conversations online about Black pain and Black trauma, but there is so much joy in being Black. It’s the most beautiful part of who I am.”

 

"...there is so much joy in being Black. It’s the most beautiful part of who I am.”

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